John Mulaney’s Rehab News is a Reminder that Recovery is a Lifelong Journey

John Mulaney

Famous comedian and Saturday Night Live alum John Mulaney has reportedly checked himself into rehab for alcohol and cocaine addiction after a relapse. Mulaney, who is 38, has been battling addiction for decades since he started drinking at the age of 13 before abusing drugs.

The comedian has been open about his relationship with alcohol and drugs and has discussed sobriety in interviews and his own comedy specials. He first became sober at the age of 23 when he stopped drinking and using drugs without the help of a treatment program.

"I drank for attention," Mulaney said in an interview with Esquire in 2019. "I was really outgoing, and then at 12, I wasn't. I didn't know how to act. And then I was drinking, and I was hilarious again."

Mulaney’s recent relapse is a helpful reminder to people everywhere that sobriety isn’t something you achieve when you stop abusing drugs – it’s a lifelong journey that will involve many obstacles and mistakes. Studies show that the relapse rate for addiction in the first year after quitting is between 40 and 60 percent. Though this number decreases over time the longer a person stays clean, there will always be triggers and life events that can tempt a person to begin using again.

Why Do People Relapse?

According to the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), individuals who recover from addiction will often experience at least one relapse in their lifetime. This doesn’t necessarily mean that the treatment they received in rehab isn’t effective. Addiction is often classified as a chronic disease that alters your brain chemistry over time and can lead to you establishing certain behaviors and habits. And anyone who has developed certain habits they’d like to change knows how hard it can be to alter one’s behavior.

When someone with an addiction develops a tolerance to any type of drug or alcohol, they will likely feel a strong desire to use it even when they’ve gone to rehab and detoxed their bodies. This is why rehab facilities offer therapies and counseling sessions in order to treat not just the body, but the mind, too. Because many people turn to drugs or alcohol when they’re stressed or feeling down, treatment programs offer new and healthier coping strategies and help individuals understand the root of their addictions.

Some triggers for relapse to be aware of include:

  • Depression
  • Exhaustion
  • Social isolation
  • Important life events such as divorce or losing a job
  • Stress or overwhelming feelings
  • Being around people or places that bring back memories of using drugs

If you have relapsed or are in danger of relapsing, it’s important you know that you have not failed in your recovery. Mistakes happen all the time and people slip up. It is recommended, however, that you seek a rehab facility you can trust as soon as possible so you can get your life back on track.

Why Go to Outpatient Rehab?

The Carter Treatment Center has outpatient programs at our facilities in Georgia that are designed to treat people who want help for addiction but don’t wish to check into a hospital or inpatient center. However, just because you’re not staying with us doesn’t mean we don’t take your treatment seriously. Our intensive programs are tailored to each of our patient’s needs so you can get the most out of your treatment while still having the flexibility to go home to your loved ones at night. This might be the best option for people who still have to go to work during the day or have family responsibilities. Our addiction counselors offer a variety of group therapy sessions, counseling, and alternative therapy treatments so you have the opportunity to learn healthy coping skills you can hold closely with you for the rest of your life.

Contact The Carter Treatment Center today online or by phone at (678) 737-4430 to learn more about whether our outpatient treatment is right for you. We operate out of facilities in Suwanee and Cumming.

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